Where hundred waters meet. Wo sich hundert Wasser treffen.

Many people who visit Vienna decide to take a day trip to Bratislava as both cities are only one hour of train travel apart. We do the whole thing the other way around which is a lot smarter I think since basing yourself in Bratislava is cheaper than in Vienna. Every hour there is a train between the central train stations of both cities. Buying a return ticket including a day ticket for all public transport in Vienna is less than 20 Euros. The new Vienna main station is a bit further out from the center, so we have to take the overloaded metro.

bty

Getting out and walking through the streets and pedestrian zones we feel like being in a real grand European metropolis. While Bratislava was medieval and tranquil, Vienna is a lot more urban and has a Baroque and Classicist core. Buildings are large and majestic, you feel like you could meet the Emperor or noble ladies with a wig every minute. It is no coincidence Vienna is consistently rated as one of the world’s cities with the highest standard of living. We pass by the famous Hotel Sacher. There are some queues to get in and every guest we see has the notorious Sachertorte – a chocolate cake – at their table. We have an old-fashioned ice-cream cup in another traditional place and see the horse carriages called Fiaker in the streets. The Hofburg is huge. Once the Habsburg emperors resided here. Now it is the seat of the Austrian president.

bty

By tram we get to the Hundertwasserhaus. It is a house concepted by Friedensreich Hundertwasser, an Austrian artist. Hundertwasser was not his real name, it literally means hundred waters. His architectural concepts differ from the linear and cubistic simple designs of other modern architects. Hundertwasser was not a fan of straight lines, everything is curvy and colorful, like being painted by a kid. His buildings look a bit like fairytale castles. The Hundertwasserhaus in Vienna is one of his largest works. You can only see it from the outside as these are used as normal residential appartments.

After Hundertwasser we cross another body of water, the Danube river, by metro to get to UNO City. The United Nations has its main seat not only in New York, but also in Nairobi, Geneva, and Vienna. The area is dominated by modern high rise buildings and straight lines and squares. We are here on Easter weekend. It is really strange, the streets are totally empty even though there are not only administration buildings but also living complexes for all the international staff. It feels like being a visitor in a post-apocalyptic future where all people have vanished for a mysterious reason. I suspect it is not so much different on weekdays. This is an artificial area and settlement, a total contrast to what Hundertwasser imagined. After enjoying the sun at the banks of the Danube, we get back to the main station and return to Bratislava.

bty

Viele Wien-Besucher machen einen Tagesausflug nach Bratislava, da beide Städte nur eine Stunde per Zugfahrt auseinander liegen. Wir machen es andersrum und besuchen Wien als Tagestrip von Bratislava. Das erscheint mir etwas schlauer, da die Unterkünfte in Bratislava deutlich günstiger sind. Der Zug zwischen beiden Städten verkehrt stündlich. Die Hin- und Rückfahrtkarte inklusive Wiener Stadtverkehr kostet weniger als 20 Euro. Der neue Wiener Hauptbahnhof befindet sich etwas außerhalb des Stadtzentrums, also müssen wir mit der überlasteten U-Bahn ins Zentrum fahren.

Raus aus der U-Bahn geht es die Straßen und Fußgängerzonen Wiens entlang. Man merkt schnell, dass man sich in einer großen würdevollen europäischen Metropole befindet. Wo Bratislava mittelalterlich und beschaulich wirkt, ist Wien deutlich großstädtischer und hat einen barocken und klassizistischen Kern. Die Gebäude wirken pompös und majestätisch. Jeden Moment könnte der Kaiser Franz-Joseph oder ein nobles Edelfräulein in Perücke um die Ecke kommen. Nicht ohne Grund wird Wien regelmäßig als eine der Städte mit der höchsten Lebensqualität weltweit bewertet. Wir kommen am berühmten Hotel Sacher vorbei. Am Einlass gibt es eine Schlange und alle Gäste haben natürlich eine Sachertorte auf ihrem Teller. Wir genehmigen uns woanders einen Eisbecher und bestaunen die Fiaker in den Straßen. Die Hofburg ist riesig. Einst herrschten die Habsburger von hier aus. Heute hat der österreichische Bundespräsident hier seinen Amtssitz.

bty

Per Straßenbahn erreichen wir das Hundertwasserhaus. Das Gebäude wurde von Friedensreich Hundertwasser entworfen, einem österreichischen Künstler. Hundertwasser war gar nicht sein echter Name. Seine Architekturkonzepte unterscheiden sich deutlich von den linearen und kubistischen Ideen anderer moderner Architekten. Hundertwasser war kein großer Fan gerader Linien. Bei ihm besteht alles aus bunten schiefen Linien und Kurven, wie bei einer Kinderzeichnung. Seine Gebäude wirken wie Märchenschlösser. Das Hundertwasserhaus gehört zu seinen größten und prominentesten Werken. Es lässt sich nur von außen bestaunen, da es als ganz normales Wohnhaus genutzt wird.

Nach Hundertwasser wird ein weiteres Wasser überquert, nämlich die Donau. Wir fahren mit der U-Bahn zur UNO City. Die Vereinten Nationen haben ihren Sitz nicht nur in New York, sondern auch in Nairobi, Genf und Wien. Das Gelände wird von modernen Hochhäusern, geraden Linien und eckigen Plätzen dominiert. Wir sind hier am Osterwochenende. Es wirkt alles recht seltsam hier. Es ist menschenleer, und dass obwohl hier nicht nur Verwaltungsgebäude sind, sondern auch Wohnkomplexe für die internationalen Mitarbeiter. Ich fühle mich wie ein Besucher in einer postapokalyptischen Zukunft, aus der aus irgend einem mysteriösen Grund alle Menschen verschwunden sind. Eigentlich glaube ich, dass es selbst an normalen Wochentagen hier nicht wirklich anders ist. Das ist eine künstliche Siedlung, ein ziemlicher Kontrast zu den Ideen von Hundertwasser. Nach einem Sonnenbad am Ufer der Donau fahren wir zurück zum Hauptbahnhof und dann wieder nach Bratislava.

bty

Advertisements

Hostel! – Or: The city where no famous people come from. Hostel! – Oder: Die Stadt, aus der keine Berühmtheiten kommen.

My next destination is mediocre in every aspect. Bratislava. It is a capital city of a country, yet not as big or famous as neighbouring cities like Vienna, Prague, or Budapest. It is old, but not super ancient, it has a medieval center, but certainly not the largest in the region, it is neither rich nor poor. Even the country itself is often overlooked. Slovakia lies nestled between its larger neighbors Czechia, Poland, and Hungary. And I have to say, among the central European countries with a slight tendency to authoritarian and populist governments Slovakia is certainly the most normal and civilized country. It has even adopted the Euro as its currency which makes travelling very convenient. What is somehow remarkable is that the city has hardly any famous daughters and sons that are known outside Slovakia. You may wonder why there is a statue of Danish fairy tale author Hans Christian Andersen. He may not have been born in Bratislava, but at least he visited the city and was quite fond of it.

It has been my longest train journey in a while. It takes us more than eight hours to get there involving a change of trains in Prague. I enjoy the ride in the Czech coaches which are somehow more convenient than the unreliable German hight-speed trains. We get off at the main station, Bratislava hlavna stanica. Our hotel is located close to the train station, but a larger walk of more than thirty minutes away from the historic center. The area looks residential and again mediocre, not posh, not poor, not urban, not like a village. On the way to our guesthouse we see another hostel, quite shabby with a hand-written note at the door to call a certail mobile number. Suddenly Eli Roth’s and Quentin Tarantino’s horror shocker movie Hostel comes into my mind where a group of backbackers is tortured to death by nasty people. And where does Hostel play? In Bratislava! The city does not appear that creepy in reality. Still I am glad to stay in a nice Penzion and not in a hostel …

cof

It is quite a walk from the railway station to the old town. You could take the bus, but the weather is sunny and we enjoy the walk. Nestled over the wide river Danube there is a castle, similar to places like Prague or Krakow. Of course we need to walk up the castle to enjoy the views over the city and the river. It is interesting to know you can just look over to Austria and Hungary even though you do not see a real border.

The historic center of the city is cute, well-preserved, and nicely walkable. Actually that thing you want on a warm and sunny day in spring with lots of opportunities to have a coffee, cake, or ice-cream. One local speciality is Trdelnik, a kind of rolled cake. It is a bit dry, I should have asked for some topping or filling maybe. We see old churches and the historic town hall. The city is full of tourists and locals. Actually there are not so many single outstanding buildings, but you just enjoy the atmosphere in the pedestrian streets.

dav

We walk the Danube river up and down. A little further away from the center there is a unique church, the blue church oder Elizabeth Church. It is consecrated to Elizabeth of Thuringia who was a Hungarian princess. Actually I painted a lovely image of Elizabeth when I was in kindergarten. The church is painted blue as the sky and thus somehow one of the most unique buildings in Bratislava. Exploring the city for one or two days is really enjoyable. And you can easily go here on a day trip from Vienna in one hour or vice versa.

cof

Mein nächstes Reiseziel ist in jeglicher Hinsicht mittelmäßig. Bratislava. Es ist die Hauptstadt eines Landes, jedoch weder so groß noch so berühmt wie die Nachbarstädte Wien, Prag oder Budapest. Die Stadt ist alt, aber nicht antik. Sie hat einen mittelalterlichen Kern, aber sicherlich die größte Altstadt der Region. Sie ist weder sonderlich arm noch reich. Auch das Land Slowakei selbst wird gerne übersehen. Es liegt zwischen Tschechien, Ungarn und Polen. Ich muss allerdings sagen, unter den mittelosteuropäischen Ländern mit einem Hang zu autoritären und populistischen Regierungen ist die Slowaki sicherlich das normalste und zivilisierteste Land. Man zahlt mit Euro, was die Reise erleichtert. Weiterhin ist es irgendwie bemerkenswert, dass die Stadt kaum berühmte Söhne und Töchter hat, die man auch außerhalb der Slowakei kennt. Es mag eine Statue des dänischen Märchendichters Hans-Christian Andersen geben, aber geboren ist er hier nicht. Zumindest hat er Bratislava bereist und war anscheinend auch sehr angetan.

bty

Ich bin lange nicht mehr so lange mit dem Zug gefahren. Wir brauchen acht Stunden inklusive eines Zwischenstopps in Prag. Die Fahrt im tschechischen Zug macht Spaß. Irgendwie ist es bequemer als im ICE. Am Hauptbahnhof in Bratislava steigen wir aus, an der hlavna stanica. Unsere Unterkunft befindet sich in Bahnhofsnähe, jedoch mehr als eine halbe Stunde zu Fuß vom Stadtzentrum entfernt. Die Wohngegend ist wiederum auch sehr mittelmäßig, nicht chic, nicht arm, nicht großstädtisch, nicht dörflich. Auf dem Weg zur Unterkunft sehen wir ein herunter gekommenes Hostel mit einem handgeschriebenen Zettel mit einer Telefonnummer. Da kommt mir plötzlich Eli Roths und Quentin Tarantinos Horrorschocker Hostel in den Sinn, wo eine Gruppe Rucksackreisender von fiesen Menschen zu Tode gefoltert wird. Und wo spielt der Film? Genau, in Bratislava. So gruselig wirkt es gar nicht hier. Dennoch bin ich froh, in einer schönen Penzion und nicht in einem Hostel zu übernachten.

Vom Bahnhof bis zur Altstadt laufen wir eine ganze Weile. Wir hätten auch den Bus nehmen können, aber es ist sonnig und es läuft sich angenehm. Über der breiten Donau thront ein Schloss, ähnlich wie in Prag oder Krakau. Natürlich lassen wir es uns nicht nehmen, den Weg zum Schloss hoch zu laufen und die Aussicht über die Stadt und die Donau zu genießen. Man kann einfach nach Österreich und Ungarn hinüberschauen, auch wenn man die Grenze nicht wirklich sieht.

cof

Die Altstadt ist gut erhalten, beschaulich und lässt sich schön erlaufen. Genau das Richtige für einen sonnigen Frühlingstag mit Einkehrmöglichkeiten für Kaffee, Kuchen oder Eis. Eine lokale Spezialität ist Trdelnik, eine Art Baumkuchen. Für mich etwas trocken, vielleicht hätte ich einen mit Glasur oder Füllung nehmen sollen. Wir sehen Kirchen und das alte Rathaus. Die Stadt ist voll mit Besuchern und Einheimischen. Einzelne herausragende Gebäude fallen nicht wirklich auf, aber die Atmosphäre in der Fußgängerzone ist sehr nett.

Wir laufen die Donau hoch und runter. Ein Stück vom Zentrum entfernt befindet sich eine besondere Kirche: die blaue Elisabeth-Kirche, die nach Elisabeth von Thüringen benannt ist, die eigentlich als ungarische Prinzessin geboren wurde. Ich habe sogar selbst im Kindergarten ein Bildnis der heiligen Elisabeth gezeichnet. Die Kirche ist himmelblau und für Bratislava-Verhältnisse ziemlich einzigartig. Es macht viel Freude, sich für einen oder zwei Tage in der Stadt aufzuhalten. Und Wien ist auch nur eine Stunde entfernt, da lohnt sich ein Tagestrip von der einen in die andere Stadt.

dav

Where the lemons grow. Dort wo die Zitronen wachsen. Dove crescono i limoni.

So where do the best lemons grow? Probably in Sorrento, located at the Amalfi coast in the Gulf of Naples. The Circumvesuviana suburban train takes us there from Naples in reasonable time. We quickly notice Sorrento is worlds away from the shabby chic of Naples. Lemon trees with shiny yellow big fruits are seen everywhere, even in the streets, even now in February.

cof

Many famous people visited Sorrento, like Henrik Ibsen, Lord Byron, or Goethe. There are posh hotels and tourist restaurants. From the cliffs you can climb down or take an elevator towards the marina where we have beautiful views of the coastline. In a cafe and the ice-cream parlor we definitely have to try something lemon or limoncello-based. Limoncello liqueur is fully of lemon aromes but is not sour. I am tempted to harvest some huge lemon fruits in the streets.

Sorrento is a base for exploring the Amalfi coast. Buses leave to Positano, ferries to Capri. Our time here is limited, so we just spend it only in Sorrento. With a taste of how beautiful the landscape and the lifestyle of the people can be in Italy – and I only imagine what it must be like in summer, we take the Circumvesuviana back to Naples.

cof

Wo wachsen nun die besten Zitronen? Wahrscheinlich in Sorrento an der Amalfiküste im Golf von Neapel. Mit der Circumvesuviana, eine Art S-Bahn, fahren wir von Neapel aus in überschaubarer Zeit her. Wir stellen schnell fest, dass Sorrento Welten vom heruntergekommenen Charme Neapels entfernt ist. Überall sind Zitronenbäume mit großen gelben Früchten zu sehen, auch in den Straßen, selbst jetzt im Februar.

sdr

Viele Berühmtheiten haben eine Zeit lang in Sorrento gelebt, wie zum Beispiel Henrik Ibsen, Lord Byron, or Goethe. Man findet hier Oberklassehotels und Touristenrestaurants. An den Klippen kann man zum Hafen hinunter laufen oder mit dem Lift fahren. Dort lassen sich fabelhafte Ausblicke auf die Küste bestaunen. In einem Cafe und einer Eisdiele müssen wir unbedingt etwas mit Zitrone oder Limoncello-Geschmack probieren. Limoncello duftet und schmeckt nach Zitronenaromen, ist jedoch nicht sauer. Ich bin auch versucht, einfach an der Straße ein paar dicke Zitronen zu pflücken.

Sorrento ist ein guter Ausgangspunkt, um die Amalfi-Küste zu erkunden. Busse fahren nach Positano, Fähren nach Capri. Unsere Zeit hier ist begrenzt und wir bleiben nur in Sorrento. Mit einem Vorgeschmack darauf, wie schön Land und Leben hier in Italien sein können – ich habe nur eine Ahnung, wie wunderbar es erst im Sommer hier sein muss – fahren wir mit der Circumvesuviana zurück nach Neapel.

cof

Pompeii.

Pompeii is famous for being destroyed by the volcano Vesuvius in 79 A.D. The ruins of ancient Pompeii are located inside the modern city of Pompei and are easily reached from Naples by train. There are scam buses from the stations to charge you a lot for a distance to the entrance that can be walked in a few minutes. The entire area is huge and you can plan for a whole day to enjoy all of the area.  Walking in the cobblestone streets of ancient Pompeii is a bit tricky sometimes, you always need to watch your step. The streets obiously double functioned as water canals to lead waste water out of the city. I wonder if Pompeii was smelly.

cof

A lot of buildings are in an amazingly good state considering their age. Jokingly I say to myself that the infrastructure in Pompeii two thousand years ago was a little better than the current one in Naples. You see lots of wealthy houses with nice interior, patios and wall paintings. Thanks to a map we were given at the entrance we can locate the most important buildings among all the houses. The Forum is the center of the city and from here you see the larger temples and have an intriguing view towards the destroyer volcano. I hope it won’t erupt while we are here.

cof

I wonder how the archeologists reconstruct the meanings of all the buildings and paintings. One famous both interesting and somehow disturbing sight are the plaster casts of victims in the moment of their death. Other famous places are the house with the inscription “Cave Canem” – beware of the dog – and the villa of the Faun. The statue of the Faun is super tiny, at least a lot smaller than I imagined. There are some other features that make this building interesting, like the mosaic of Alexander the Great and the cute patio.

We are here in February, probably in off season. Yet it becomes crowded over the day. I wonder what it is like to walk among the masses of people in hot July or August. Filled with lots of impressions of what ancient Roman cities looked like and what powers a volcano has, we slowly go back to Naples in the afternoon.

cof

Pompeii ist vor allem dafür bekannt, vom Vesuv im Jahr 79 zerstört worden zu sein. Die Ruinen des antiken Pompeii befinden sich innerhalb der modernen Stadt Pompei und lassen sich recht einfach von Neapel aus per Zug erreichen. Es gibt unseriöse Shuttlebusse an den Bahnhöfen, die sich für ein kurzes Fahrstück fürstlich entlohnen lassen wollen. Der Weg dauert zu Fuß nur wenige Minuten. Das ganze Ausgrabungsgebiet ist riesig und man braucht einen vollen Tag, um alles zu sehen. Auf den Pflasterstraßen Pompeiis zu laufen ist nicht immer ganz einfach. Man muss ständig darauf achten, wo man hintritt. Die Straßen wurden gleichzeitig auch als Abwasserkanäle genutzt. Ich frage mich, ob es damals in Pompeiis Straßen gestunken hat.

dav

Etliche Gebäude sind in Anbetracht ihres Alters in einem erstaunlich guten Zustand. Ich denke so bei mir, dass die Infrastruktur im Pompeii vor zweitausend Jahren besser war als heutzutage in Neapel. Man sieht viele edle Villen mit netter Einrichtung, Innenhöfen und Wandgemälden. Mit Hilfe der Karte, die wir am Eingang bekommen haben, können wir unter all den Häusern die wichtigsten Gebäude ausfindig machen. Das Forum befindet sich im Zentrum der Stadt und hier stehen auch größere Tempel. Von hier aus sieht man den zerstörerischen Vesuv besonders gut im Hintergrund lauern. Ich hoffe, dass er nicht gerade jetzt ausbrechen muss, wenn wir hier sind.

cof

Ich frage mich, wie die Archäologen die Bedeutung all der Gebäude und Gemälde rekonstruieren. Ein interessanter und zugleich unheimlicher Anblick sind die als Statue gegossenen menschlichen Abdrücke  der Opfer des Vulkanausbruchs im Moment ihres Todes. Unter den weiteren interessanten Orten findet man das Haus mit der Inschrift “Cave Canem” – Vorsicht vor dem Hunde – und die Villa des Fauns. Die Statue des Fauns ist superwinzig, jedenfalls hatte ich sie mir größer vorgestellt. Und es gibt noch andere Merkmale, die das Haus interessant machen, wie das Mosaik von Alexander dem Großen und der schöne Innenhof. 

cof

Wir sind im Februar hier, also mehr oder weniger Nebensaison. Trotzdem wird es über den Tag recht voll hier. Ich frage mich, wie es erst ist, im Juli oder August in der Hitze unter den Menschenmassen zu flanieren. Voll mit Impressionen, wie eine antike römische Stadt ausgesehen hat und welche Kräfte ein Vulkan entfesseln kann, machen wir uns am Nachmittag langsam auf den Rückweg nach Neapel.

cof

Pizza, Pasta, Pastiera.

Naples is a paradise for food lovers. I have never eaten better in any other place in Europe. Lots of great foods are suitable for vegetarians, for vegans not so much even though there is still a better choice than in many other countries. You will quickly note there are not many foreign restaurants in Naples as Italians are very proud of their kitchen and nobody would want to eat anything else. As in the whole of Italy, coffee and gelato are always great, but there is a lot more.

Pizza: One thing you will definitely have to try is the famous Napolitan pizza, best in its original variety as Pizza Margherita. There are many places that sell a high quality affordable version of this amazing piece of culinary art. Lots of tourists prefer to queue at the Julia Robert’s Eat-Pray-Love L’Antica Pizzeria da Michele or at Sorbillo, but just go to number 4 or 5 on Tripadvisor of the Google ranking, and you will find an equally appealing pizza without having to queue for hours. Vegans will love Pizza Marinara. It’s like the Margherita, but without cheese.

cof

Fried Pizza: Before visiting Naples I did not know fried pizza is a thing. Now that I know it I love it. Instead of being oven-baked, the pizza is wrapped like a calzone and deep-fried. It comes in several flavors. If in doubt, stick to the Margherita or Marinara versions.

Pasta: Though Naples is one homeplace of the pizza, there is also great pasta here. One local dish is Gnocchi alla Sorrentina derived from the nearby town of Sorrento. It is Gnocchi with tomatoes, Mozzarella, and basil. Simple and delicious.

Fried Snacks: You can find simple fried savoury snacks like crochette in many places. One of my favorites are Arancini – deep-fried risotto rice balls.

edf

Sfogliatelle: The ubiquituous dessert in Naples are Sfogliatelle. They are made from a kind of puff pastry dough filled with semolina and ricotta. The filling is flavored with vanilla, cinnamon and oranges. I have eaten at least one piece of this heavenly pastry thing a day. Another famous dessert cake is the Pastiera, just in case you would like to try something different.

Limoncello: In Sorrento close to Naples lemons grow almost all year round and their taste is incredible. One of the best things that is made from these lemons is the famous Limoncello liqueur which is great after dinner.

sdr

Neapel ist ein Paradies für alle, die Essen lieben. Nirgendwo sonst habe ich in Europa besser essen können. Viele fantastische Gerichte sind für Vegetarier geeignet. Für Veganer gilt das nur eingeschränkt, selbst wenn die Auswahl hier besser als in vielen anderen Ländern ist. In Neapel sieht man nur wenige Restaurants mit nicht-italienischer Küche. Die Menschen sind hier sehr stolz auf ihre Küche und sehen gar keine Notwendigkeit, etwas anderes zu essen. So wie in ganz Italien sind Kaffee und Eis immer super, aber es gibt noch viel mehr.

Pizza: Worum man überhaupt nicht drum herum kommt, ist die neapolitanische Pizza, am besten in ihrer reinsten Urform als Pizza Margherita. Viele Pizzerien bieten zu einem günstigen Preis eine qualitativ hochwertige Variante dieses fantastischen kulinarischen Kunstwerks an. Etliche Touristen stellen sich liebend gern bei Sorbillo oder L’Antica Pizzeria da Michele an, die aus Eat Pray Love mit Julia Roberts bekannt ist, aber wenn man sich an Platz 4 oder 5 bei Google oder Tripadvisor hält, erhält man eine ebenso gute Pizza in einer anderen Pizzeria ohne sich stundenlang anstellen zu müssen. Für Veganer bietet sich die Pizza Marinara an. Die ist fast wie eine Margherita, nur ohne Käse.

Frittierte Pizza: Vor meiner Reise nach Neapel war mir frittierte Pizza überhaupt kein Begriff. Jetzt da ich sie kenne, liebe ich sie. Statt im Ofen auszubacken, wird die Pizza wie eine Calzone zusammengeklappt und in Öl frittiert. Man findet sie in verschiedenen Geschmacksrichtung, im Zweifelsfall liegt man mit einer Margherita oder Marinara-Version nie falsch.

Pasta: Auch wenn Neapel eine Heimat der Pizza darstellt, gibt es hier natürlich auch tolle Pasta. Eine regionale Variante sind die Gnocchi alla Sorrentina aus dem nahegelegenen Ort Sorrento. Das sind letztlich Gnocchi mit Tomaten, Mozzarellla und Basilikum. Einfach und lecker.

cof

Frittierte Snacks: Einfache frittierte Snacks wie Crochette lassen sich vielerorts finden. Einer meiner liebsten Snacks sind Arancini – frittierte Risotto-Bällchen.

Sfogliatelle: Das klassische Dessert-Gebäck in Neapel sind Sfogliatelle. Sie werden aus einer Art Blätterteig hergestellt und mit Gries und Ricotta gefüllt, welcher mit Vanille, Zimt und Orangen aromatisiert wird. Von diesen leckeren Teilchen habe ich wenigstens eins pro Tag vernascht. Ein anderes leckeres Backwerk ist die neapolitanische Pastiera – für den Fall, dass man auch mal was anderes probieren möchte.

Limoncello: Im nahegelegenen Sorrento wachsen das ganze Jahr über Zitronen und deren Geschmack ist unvergleichlich. Zu den wunderbarsten Dingen, die man aus den Zitronen herstellen kann, gehört der Limoncello-Likör, den man am besten nach einer Mahlzeit zu sich nimmt.

cof

Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo.

The good, the bad, and the ugly. This is some nice summary for my trip to Naples. Originally I wanted to be at some totally different place at this time, but an unexpected influenza experience crashed my original plans and so I am here on a spontaneous European winter trip. I always wanted to see Naples, so this is a good opportunity. The flight from Berlin is cheap, the airplane full of Italians, hardly any Germans. Same in the city.

I quickly realize Naples is not your typical fancy European city destination. Getting off the airport bus at Piazza Garibaldi where the central railway station is located, I am actually glad I did not book a cheap accommodation in this area. I know areas around railway stations are often a bit shady, but this one makes an even worse unwelcoming appearance. We just board the metro from here to take us further into the city. Somehow it is not a normal modern metro that arrives at the platform, but a really old bumpy train full of grafitti with strange seating that could come straight out of World War II. It takes us where we want to go, so it is fine.

dav

The historic center of Naples is huge, one of the largest in Europe in fact. This is where we have our accommodation, in a typical high old house situated at a narrow alley with some kind of backyard. Everywhere you see laundry hanging, just as you would imagine here. And another clichee is true. You cannot just walk in peace through the alleys. There are motorscooters roaming up and down the small streets, even cars. Hardly any buildings are renovated. This city is no fancy gentrified hipster meeting place, even though there is probably huge potential. It is easy to get lost here wandering through the maze of the old city. It is just like you would imagine old and rough Southern Italy. I love it. Some of the greatest things is the food here, I make a separate article about it.

cof

At the fringes of the old town there are some more elaborate palaces, noble buildings, and old castles and fortresses. We enter the Castell dell’Ovo at the sea and have nice views from here over the bay and Mount Vesuvius. Actually the Vesuvious appears kind of lurking in the background waiting silently to unleash its full powers. There is probably no other metropolitan area in Europe that large and so close to an active volcano.

sdr

We walk over to the Spanish Quarters, the Quartieri Spagnoli. This area looks similar to the old town and has equal potential for gentrification. It is also a popular place for independent travellers to stay and often guidebooks advise to be careful here and not to go out at night. I do not think it is that bad but I can somehow understand some people might be worried. A funicular takes us up to another fortress. The Castell Sant’Elmo. I have to think of Malta, Sesame Street, and the Man in Motion again – I explain it in my Valetta post.

cof

Many tourists just skip Naples since it gets a bad rap. Even in Italy some people say it is Europe’s largest slum. And I have to say I have not seen a city in neither Southern nor Eastern Europe which appears equally run down. Somehow it does not even feel like a European place anymore, more like some place in the Middle East or Asia. I do not mean this in a bad sense, I enjoy my stay here. I believe for independent travellers it is worth staying maybe for two days at least. It makes for a good base to explore the surroundings and you feel like being in an authentic place, not in some postcard tourist bubble. Napoli ti amo!

sdr

Das ist der Originaltitel des Westerns “Zwei glorreiche Halunken” – das Gute, das Schlechte und das Hässliche. Das fasst meine Reise nach Neapel ganz gut zusammen. Eigentlich wollte ich um diese Zeit ganz woanders sein, aber ein unerwarteter Grippe-Zwischenfall zerschmettert meine ursprünglichen Reisepläne und so bin ich hier auf einem spontanten Winter-Kurztrip in Europa. Ich wollte schon immer mal nach Neapel und so nutze ich diese Gelegenheit. Der Flug von Berlin ist billig, das Flugzeug voll mit Italienern, fast keine Deutschen. In der Stadt selbst das gleiche Bild.

cof

Schnell erkenne ich, dass Neapel keine typische schicke europäische Touristenstadt ist. Wir steigen an der Piazza Garibaldi am Hauptbahnhof aus dem Flughafenbus aus und ich bin froh, nicht in dieser Gegend die Unterkunft gebucht zu haben. Bahnhofsviertel sind ja nie wirklich nett, aber hier verbreitet sich ein besonders unangenehmes Gefühl. Wir nehmen die Metro zur Weiterfahrt. Anstatt eines modernen U-Bahn-Zugs rattert ein vollständig mit Grafitti bemaltes Gefährt am Bahnsteig ein, welches noch aus Reichsbahn-Zeiten stammen könnte. Zumindest bringt es uns an unser Ziel.

cof

Das historische Stadtzentrum Neapels ist gigantisch groß, auf jeden Fall eines der größten in Europa. Dort haben wir unsere Unterkunft, in einem typischen hohen alten Haus in einer schmalen Gasse mit einem Innenhof. Überall hängt draußen Wäsche, genau wie man es sich vorstellen würde. Und noch ein anderes Klischeebild begegnet uns hier häufig: Die ganzen Motorroller und sogar Kleinwagen, die durch die Gassen rasen und die das friedliche Flanieren in den Gassen erschweren. Kaum ein Gebäude ist saniert. Die Stadt ist kein schmucker gentrifizierter Treffpunkt für Hipster, hat aber tatsächlich einiges Potenzial dafür. Man verliert sich schnell im Labyrinth der Gassen. Hier ist es genau so, wie ich mir den alten und rauen Süden Italiens immer vorgestellt habe. Wunderbar! Zu den tollsten Dingen gehört hier das Essen, dazu schreibe ich noch einen separaten Artikel.

dav

An den Rändern der Altstadt befinden sich größere und elegante Gebäude und Paläste, Burgen und Festungen. Wir besuchen das Castell dell’Ovo direkt am Meer und haben schöne Blicke von hier auf den Golf von Neapel und den Vesuv. Der Vulkan lauert still im Hintergrund, aber gut sichtbar, darauf irgendwann seine volle Kraft wieder einzusetzen. Wahrscheinlich gibt es kein anderes Ballungsgebiet in Europa, das so nah an einem aktiven Vulkan gebaut ist. 

cof

Wir laufen rüber ins spanische Viertel, die Quartieri Spagnoli. Dort sieht es ähnlich aus wie in der Altstadt und das Gentrifizierungspotenzial ist ähnlich hoch. Hier kommen Rucksackreisende auch gerne unter und Reiseführer raten dazu, in dieser Gegend vorsichtig zu sein und auf Nachtspaziergänge zu verzichten. Ganz so schlimm scheint es mir nicht so zu sein, aber ich verstehe schon, warum manche Leute hier unruhig werden. Eine Zahnradbahn bringt uns zu einer weiteren Festung, dem Castell Sant’Elmo. Das erinnert mich wieder an Malta, die Sesamstraße und den Man in Motion, ich erkläre das alles in meinem Beitrag zu Valetta.

dav

Viele Touristen kommen wegen des schlechten Rufs gar nicht nach Neapel. Selbst in Italien sagt man, dass die Stadt Europas größter Slum wäre. Und ich habe weder in Südeuropa noch in Osteuropa einen Ort erlebt, der ähnlich herunter gekommen wirkt. Es fühlt sich nicht mehr an wie in Europa, sondern mehr wie in Asien oder dem Nahen Osten. Das meine ich gar nicht negativ, denn mein Aufenthalt hier macht mir viel Freude. Individualreisende können hier problemlos zwei nette Tage oder mehr verbringen. Und die Stadt eignet sich gut aus Basis für Ausflüge in die Umgebung. Man ist an einem authentischen Ort, nicht in einer künstlichen Postkartenidylle. Napoli ti amo!

sdr

Eine Woche Wanderurlaub in Madeira für Individualreisende.

Madeira ist eine saftig-grüne Insel irgendwo zwischen Portugal, Afrika und den Kanarischen Inseln gelegen. Die Insel ist wegen ihres milden atlantischen Klimas ein idealer Zufluchtsort in allen vier Jahreszeiten. Naturliebhaber und Wanderfreunde lieben diese zerklüftete Insel. Zwar ist sie besonders bei Pauschalreisenden aus Ländern wie Deutschland oder Großbritannien sehr beliebt, aber Madeira lässt sich auch individuell mit öffentlichen Verkehrsmitteln bereisen. Madeira ist ideal für einen einwöchigen Urlaub und wir schauen uns die schönsten Wanderungen für diejenigen an, die zum ersten Mal die Insel besuchen und von allem ein bisschen sehen wollen.

cof
Hafen in Funchal

Erkundungsbasis

Funchal ist die Hauptstadt von Madeira. Verkehrsverbindungen, Einkaufsmöglichkeiten und Restaurants bieten hier die größte Vielfalt, so dass es sich lohnt, sich in Funchal eine Unterkunft zu suchen und Tagesausflüge von hier zu starten. Die Lage spielt eine wichtige Rolle in der bergigen Stadt. Je weiter unten am Hafen, desto besser. Es gibt verschiedene Busunternehmen. Einige haben ihr Terminal nahe der Seilbahn, andere halten am großen Boulevard entlang der Uferpromenade. Zahlreiche Restaurants befinden sich in den Fußgängerzonen der Stadt. Anders als sonst im ländlichen Portugal ist es in Funchal auch kein Problem, Restaurants mit vegetarischen und veganen Gerichten zu finden.

edf
Funchal

Flughafen

Von allen wichtigen großen Flughäfen gibt es das ganze Jahr über Direktflüge nach Madeira. Wo kein Direktflug angeboten ist, kommt eventuell eine Umsteigeverbindung über Lissabon in Frage. Vom Flughafen in Madeira kann man über eine preisgünstige und annähernd stündlich verkehrende Busverbindung in 30 bis 60 Minuten nach Funchal fahren, je nachdem in welchen Teil der Stadt man genau hin möchte.

Wandertouren

1 Seilbahn und Levada dos Tornos

Diese einfache Wanderung von Funchal aus eignet sich für den Einstieg ins Wanderabenteuer. Um sich den anstrengenden Aufstieg zu ersparen, fährt man per Seilbahn vom Zentrum Funchals bis hoch nach Monte. Dort erwarten uns lohnende Ausblicke über die Stadt. Nach einem kleinen Abstecher zur Kirche Igreja do Monte kehren wir wieder zurück zum Ausgangspunkt und laufen in Richtung Westen. Nach einem kleinen Steilstück geht es dann nur noch ziemlich gerade weiter.

cof
Levada dos Tornos

Den größten Teil des Weges laufen wir neben der Levada dos Tornos. Levadas sind typisch für Madeira und wurden früher nur als Bewässerungskanäle benutzt. Heutzutage ist die Levada-Wanderung unverzichtbarer Teil des Wandererlebnisses in Madeira. Auf dem Weg kommen wir an den niedergebrannten Ruinen des Choupana Hills Hotel vorbei und können uns einen Tee, Kaffee oder einen Snack im Hortensia Gardens Tea House gönnen. Als nächstes geht es weiter zu den Palheiro Gardens. Von hier aus laufen wir runter zur Hauptstraße und nehmen einen der Busse in Richtung Funchal.

cof
Blick vom Wanderweg auf Funchal.
2 Nonnental – Curral das Freiras

Auch dieser Ausflug ist einfach zu bewältigen, am besten als Halbtagestour. Die Berge sind hier majestätisch und der Ausblick spektakulär. Mit Bus #81 fährt man von Funchal bis zum Hotel an der Eira do Serrado. Von hier oben ist der Ausblick ins Tal ganz fantastisch. Für die Wanderung geht es einfach nur bergab ins Tal. Unten im Dorf gibt es ein paar Einkehrmöglichkeiten für Mittagessen oder einen Kaffee. Von hier aus nimmt man den gleichen Bus zurück nach Funchal. Wer es anstrengender mag, kann auch ins Dorf fahren und den Weg von unten nach oben nach Eira do Serrado laufen.

dav
Curral das Freiras
3 Ribeiro Frio nach Portela

Für einen Einblick in das zerklüftete Inselinnere empfehlen wir diese Tageswanderung. Man nimmt Bus #56 oder #103 in Richtung Santana und steigt in Ribeiro Frio aus. Auf dem ersten Teil der Wanderung ist man umringt von anderen Touristen. Von der Bushaltestelle am Ortseingang von Ribeiro Frio laufen wir ein kurzes Stück zum Aussichtspunkt Balcões – dem Balkon über das Tal.

cof
Balcões

Nachdem wir uns satt gesehen haben, wandern wir dasselbe Stück in Richtung Dorf wieder zurück, überqueren die Straße und beginnen das lange Teilstück entlang einer Levada durch den grünen Wald. Diese Wanderung ist zwar lang, aber nicht sehr anspruchsvoll, denn es gibt fast keine steilen Abschnitte. Der Wanderweg endet in Portela, einem winzigen Dörfchen mit einem Restaurant. Von hier aus geht es per Bus (Linie #20, 53, 78) zurück nach Funchal. Hier lohnt es sich, genau vorauszuplanen. Wir empfehlen, die Wanderung an einem Wochentag durchzuführen. Am Wochenende und an Feiertagen fahren nur sehr wenige Busse von hier und es besteht die Gefahr, hier stundenlang fest zu hängen. Manchmal warten hier auch Taxis, oft aber auch nicht.

cof
Weg nach Portela
4 Pico Ruivo

Der Pico Ruivo ist der höchste Berg Madeiras und der dritthöchste Portugals. Man kann ihn vom Fuße aus besteigen, aber wir schlagen eine leichtere Variante vor. So wie in Route #3 nimmt man den Bus von Funchal nach Santana, bleibt aber bis zur Endstation sitzen. Es verkehren sowohl Expressbusse als auch langsamere Busse, die jedoch Abstecher durch spektakuläre saftig-grüne Landschaften und steile Gebirgsgegenden machen. Santana befindet sich an Madeiras Nordküste und ist für Häuschen in traditioneller Bauweise bekannt. Außerdem lassen sich einige nette Cafés und Restaurants finden.

cof
Typische Häuschen in Santana

Leider gibt es keine Busverbindung in Richtung Berg, man kann jedoch ein Taxi vom Ort bis zum Parkplatz des Pico Ruivo nehmen – die Stelle nennt sich Achada do Teixera. Dem Fahrer sollte man beim Absetzen Bescheid geben, sich dort nach zwei Stunden wieder abholen zu lassen. Für den Aufstieg kann man eine Stunde oder weniger einplanen, der Rückweg geht deutlich zügiger vonstatten. Der Wanderpfad ist in exzellentem Zustand. Diese Wanderung ist von den hier beschriebenen die anspruchsvollste, ist aber dennoch eigentlich nicht besonders schwierig. Man schwitzt ein wenig, aber das war es dann auch schon. Bei gutem Wetter ist der Ausblick vom Gipfel wunderschön. Und nachdem wir uns satt gesehen haben, kehrt man auf dem gleichen Weg zurück wie man gekommen ist, das gilt auch für den Bus zurück nach Funchal.

cof
Hoch zum Pico Ruivo
5 Halbinsel Ponta de São Lourenço

Dieser Teil Madeiras unterscheidet sich komplett von den anderen Gegenden. Die schmale Halbinsel weist eine karge Landschaft auf, die auf beiden Seiten vom Meer begrenzt wird. Man ist den Elementen ausgesetzt, insbesondere Sonne und Wind, allerdings regnet es hier seltener als im Inselinnern. Die Schönheit der Landschaft lockt zahlreiche Besucher an. Von Funchal nimmt man den Bus #113 nach Baia D’Abra.

sdr
Ponta de São Lourenço

Von hier aus geht es direkt los mit dem Wanderweg. Es geht ständig hoch und runter. Das letzte Teilstück der Strecke hoch zum Ponta do Furado ist sehr steil. Man kann es weglassen, verpasst allerdings auch eine wunderbare Aussicht auf den Rest der Halbinsel. Um zurückzukommen, läuft und fährt man wieder genauso wie man gekommen ist.

cof
Blick zurück auf die Hauptinsel von der Ponta de São Lourenço

Weiter gehts

An den wanderfreien Tagen kann man sich ausruhen oder Funchal zum Einkaufen oder Sightseeing erkunden. Eine Woche auf Madeira ist schneller um als man denkt. Erfahrenen Madeira-Besuchern bietet sich eine Vielzahl an weiteren Wanderwegen in den unterschiedlichsten Landschaften, zum Beispiel mehr im Innern der Insel.

cof
Funchal bei Nacht